Tag Archives: Dreadnoks

Ripper (1985)

The Dreadnoks were an impressive addition to the Cobra ranks to a kid in the 80s. With an edgy design amalgam of punk and the Road Warrior, they were a threatening force of destruction. Ripper is one of the original Dreadnoks, and as such, is equipped with an amazing melee weapon along with an unexpected implement of destruction — the

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Dreadnok Buzzer (2005)

Buzzer was the first Dreadnok figure I picked up in 1985, and he was an instant favorite. I probably didn’t “get” much of the biker gang references within the ‘Noks’ look at the time, but I thought back then that they reminded me of the bad guys from the Road Warrior movie. Funny how my first exposure to that film

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Dreadnok Cycle (2004)

Remember when convention exclusive vehicles’ secondary market prices didn’t reach instananeous and stratospheric heights? Up until a few years ago, one could initially pick up many JoeCon items for a 20 to 30 percent mark-up. Some items from those days, like this Dreadnok Cycle, weren’t all that popular at their time of release. Today, many of the attendee exclusives seem

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Dreadnok Ripper (2008)

All three of the original Dreadnoks were very cool characters, and some of the most out-there action figures of the 1980s. After all, what’s not to love about a group of rough and tumble bikers who looked like they stumbled off the set of a Mad Max film. Larry Hama’s characterizations of the group in the Marvel comic always made

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Monkeywrench (1986)

Out of all the 80’s Dreadnoks, I think Monkeywrench most resembles a regular biker gang hooligan. He doesn’t have any new wave hairstyle, funky glasses or armor plated jeans. Instead, he’s decided to accessorize with patches and bandanas. In the end, he’s not too wild looking, just a long haired dude in jeans, vest and grenade bandolier. Okay, forget what

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Monkeywrench (2009)

Sometimes parts reuse just doesn’t turn out as well as expected. As a former action figure customizer, I can appreciate having a vision for a base figure and thinking that vision will be borne out in the end. I’ve also had experiences in which the limitations of the base figure couldn’t be overcome, and the final figure didn’t match what

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Buzzer (2007)

Have I mentioned before that the 25th anniversary series both frustrates and inspires? Articulation, fit and proportion issues were balanced with innovations that would be improved upon in the modern line. For me, the accessories were the most solid aspect of the figures. Whether harnesses, backpacks or weapons, I was impressed. The designers improved on many of the old weapon

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